Posts tagged ‘jargon’

May 9, 2014

Composition

by Suzy Walker-Toye

The term composition can be applied to all the elements of the shot explored in this section. The framing of the shot, the camera angle, colours, lighting, mise-en-scène, sound and movement are all elements in the composition.
While framing can be seen as a part of the overall composition, the two terms are often used together, ie ‘Framing and Composition’. It may be useful to think of framing as the selection of a certain area of space and the objects and people within it, and composition as the arrangement of the objects, people and space within the frame.

(source: p34 of course notes)

Advertisements
May 9, 2014

Camera angles: High, Low, Canted Frame, POV

by Suzy Walker-Toye

Camera Angles

(source: p26 of course notes)

The same sequence can feel very different when viewed from different angles.
At eye level the scene seems quite ‘normal’. The action is fairly flat and the angle itself gives little away.
The high angle makes the same scene appear more dynamic and exciting. The character seems less powerful and significant; there may be some threat from a bigger force.
The low angle shot is also more dynamic and exciting than the eye level. Here the character seems more powerful; the sense of threat is more likely to come from within the scene, possibly from the character herself.

(source: p27 of course notes)

May 9, 2014

Mise-en-scène

by Suzy Walker-Toye

The term mise-en-scène can be literally translated as ‘putting in the scene’. It refers to the placement of objects, and the arrangement of space within a frame. The term originates in the theatre where all perceived space has to be represented in a fixed frame, ie the stage. The arrangement of items and actors may produce a cosy living room or a battle raging over a mountain range, both contained in the same absolute physical space.

The mise-en-scène can also affect the overall atmosphere and meaning of a shot. A cluttered crowded space has a different feel to an open exposed place. The placing of different items within the space can change the emphasis placed on them. Items in the centre and foreground are likely to be more noticeable than items at the back or edges of the frame.

(source: p35 of course notes)

May 9, 2014

Storyboards

by Suzy Walker-Toye

Storyboards are illustrations representing the shots within your film. Typically each sketch represents the framing and composition of a single shot. Notes describing action, dialogue, camera movement and technical information may also accompany each storyboard cell.

(source: p24 of course notes)

May 9, 2014

Frame Sizes

by Suzy Walker-Toye

A good guide to understanding these relative sizes is to think of the wide shot as a reference against which the other sizes are measured.

frame sizes

(source: p23 of course notes)

May 9, 2014

Shots

by Suzy Walker-Toye

The shots that make up each scene need to maintain a continuity that is dictated by the logic of the scene – for example the light levels, colour balance and background sound are likely to be the same for all shots in the same scene. The logic of the space must be continuous. If character A is to the left of character B in one shot, this relationship must appear to be maintained in the next. If character B moves, the audience must be made aware of this. In composing each shot we therefore need to consider the design, composition and logic of the whole scene.
A shot is one continuous image. As soon as the continuity is broken (when there is a cut) the shot ends.

Each shot may be a new frame or there may be movement within the shot so that it contains different frames.

(source: p15/16 of course notes)

For every shot it is essential to consider what you want the audience to see and how best to direct them to this.

(source: p18 of course notes)

May 9, 2014

Scenes

by Suzy Walker-Toye

Beyond this the film can then be broken down into scenes. A scene is a distinct segment within a film that normally takes place in a single location and in a single period of time. The atmosphere, pace, and style of a scene will be dictated by its own internal logic, the location, the action and information it seeks to convey and its purpose and placement in the overall structure of the film.

(source: p15 of course notes)

May 9, 2014

Acts/Sections

by Suzy Walker-Toye

A film may be broken down into component sections. In the diagram above it has been subdivided into three acts. These sections define the overall structure of the film. The film as a whole and the sections within a film should have some kind of common style, feel and logic.

(source: p15 of course notes)

May 9, 2014

Framing

by Suzy Walker-Toye

Framing is the art of choosing what to put on the screen.

(source: p14/15 of course notes)

film structure breakdown

May 9, 2014

Frame

by Suzy Walker-Toye

The frame is the fundamental unit of production in a film. Every image within the film is contained within a frame. Every time a shot changes or the camera moves there is a new frame.
In thinking about the function of a frame it is useful to consider its place in the overall structure of the film. In this section you’ll be looking at the elements that build to make a successful frame. It is important to remember that the success of a frame is defined by its function in the completed film.

The frame serves a functional purpose – it defines what we see. As any idea is developed for the screen the primary question has to be ‘what will be shown?’ Having decided what will be shown the film-maker can then consider how to show it.

Each frame will have its own internal logic; it will reveal something new or affect the audience in a new way. It is only by a series of changes and progressions within and between frames that the film can develop.

(source: p14-15 of course notes)

The type of frame within a film that we have defined above is very small, perhaps only lasting a couple of seconds on screen. Scores of frames may make up a single scene.

(source: p16 of course notes)